milfredsmind:

fucknosexistcostumes:

quetz0vercoatl:

mytongueisforked:

snarkbender:

petitepasserine:

white women of hollywood, reducing japan and japanese culture to cupcakes, sexy ”costumes” and submissive sex-kittens since god knows when

white people, this is why nobody trusts you

yeah, so white women fetishize, objectify, and commodify woc as well and treat us like props.

this is why we don’t trust you. 

In response to your logic, please find attached a picture of Hyuna Kim “fetishizing” and “commodifying” american culture. Yes I know she’s Korean, but J-pop and K-pop are relatively close in style, so don’t be pernickety. This use of other cultures isn’t a one way thing; as far as I know, American culture isn’t only basketball shirts and sunglasses.

Also, your Katy Perry picture is a poor example of the message you’re trying to convey. She, as well as her backing dancers, is in traditional Japanese dress, and there is not a cupcake or submissive sex kitten in sight.

And to add to that, what makes me really angry is that you are complaining about white women being racist and culturally stereotyping women of colour, and your response is what? “This is why nobody trusts you” - racism. Talk about hypocritical, you’re making sweeping statements about the Caucasian population as untrustworthy because a few dumb commercialised bitches in America made some music videos. Get off your high horse, just because you feel victimised by something doesn’t give you the right to do the same to others.

I didn’t want to get involved in this debate, I made a post yesterday and deleted it because I really can’t be bothered to deal with the inevitable backlash, but really this is getting stupid I’ve seen so many posts about it since then and it’s getting on my nerves.

"Yeah she’s Korean, but Korea and Japan are basically the same, right guys??" ….

Katy Perry and her dancers were NOT in “traditional dress”, jesus christ.

They were in sexed up kimonos with thigh-high slits in the sides, and face paint. Her “kimono” (which actually looks more like a cheongsam..) has a chest window! It’s a very poor, sexualised interpretation of geisha.
The fact that anyone would think that is how geisha actually dress shows how influential this type of representation can be. Here’s a photo of a geisha so you can see the difference.

Not to mention in the k-pop picture they don’t have a bunch of Caucasian girls dressed in basketball jerseys dancing around for them. They are just taking the clothes and that particular style of dress. American artists are using Japanese girls, not Japanese fashion, there is a big difference. I’ve had guys tell me they have “yellow fever”, that “Japanese girls get kinky” and a guy even showed me a picture of another Japanese girl in wearing a kitten costume “begging for treats” when I mention that I’m Japanese. People feel they have the right to say some straight up creepy things to me because I am Japanese and this is the image they have of my culture and consequently me.

Also do your research before you want to try and defend pop stars exploiting Japanese girls because Katy Perry is NOWHERE NEAR “TRADITIONAL WEAR.”

(via misandry-mermaid)


feminismandpugsarelife:

It’s not that men are unable to control their sexual desires. It’s that they’re taught that they neither can nor have to, so they choose - unconsciously or otherwise - not to.

(via misandry-mermaid)



They don’t “accidentally” rape women. They don’t “misread the signals”. Every day, men who pretend that they are incapable of telling that women don’t want them to penetrate their bodies, read hundreds of social signals expertly. They know when to joke about with the boss; when to back down gracefully in a meeting without losing face; when to negotiate hard and when to keep some back for the next deal; they know when to banter with their colleagues and when to be professional. They know when to slap down someone in a pub or a club or on a train and when that would be dangerous – most men, like most women, are very, very good at negotiating social signals.

Toxic masculinity hurts men, but there’s a big difference between women dealing with the constant threat of being raped, beaten, and killed by the men in their lives, and men not being able to cry.
Robert Jensen (via quoilecanard)

(via rapeculturerealities)


We often experience our bodies as a fragile encumbrance, rather than the media for the enactment of our aims. We feel as though we must have our attention directed upon our bodies to make sure they are doing what we wish them to do, rather than paying attention to what we want to do through our bodies

Typically, the feminine body underuses its real capacity, both as the potentiality of its physical size and strength and as the real skills and coordination that are available to it

An essential part of the situation of being a woman is that of living the ever-present possibility that one will be gazed upon as a mere body, as shape and flesh that presents itself as the potential object of another subject’s intentions and manipulations, rather than as a living manifestation of action and intention. The source of this objectified bodily existence is in the attitude of others regarding her, but the woman herself often actively takes up her body as a mere thing. She gazes at it in the mirror, worries about how it looks to others, prunes it, shapes it, molds and decorates it.

This objectified bodily existence accounts for the self-consciousness of the feminine relation to her body and resulting distance she takes from her body

Iris Marion Young, Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essays in Feminist Philosophy and Social Theory, 1990. (via ausfeminist)

(via seebster)


Trauma impels people both to withdraw from close relationships and to seek them desperately. The profound disruption in basic trust, the common feelings of shame, guilt, and inferiority, and the need to avoid reminders of the trauma that might be found in social life, all foster withdrawal from close relationships. But the terror of the traumatic event intensifies the need for protective attachments. The traumatized person therefore frequently alternates between isolation and anxious clinging to others. […] It results in the formation of intense, unstable relationships that fluctuate between extremes.
Judith Herman in Trauma and Recovery (via aloegoo)

(via retracing-my-steps)



The opposite of depression is not happiness, but vitality, and it was vitality that seemed to seep away from me in that moment. Everything there was to do seemed like too much work. I would come home and I would see the red light flashing on my answering machine, and instead of being thrilled to hear from my friends, I would think, “What a lot of people that is to have to call back.” Or I would decide I should have lunch, and then I would think, but I’d have to get the food out and put it on a plate and cut it up and chew it and swallow it, and it felt to me like the Stations of the Cross.

And one of the things that often gets lost in discussions of depression is that you know it’s ridiculous. You know it’s ridiculous while you’re experiencing it. You know that most people manage to listen to their messages and eat lunch and organize themselves to take a shower and go out the front door and that it’s not a big deal, and yet you are nonetheless in its grip and you are unable to figure out any way around it.

Andrew Solomon, Depression - The Secret We Share, TED talks (via feigenbaumsworld)

This is exactly it.

(via myatomscamefromstars)

(via seebster)